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Response to letter to the editor

Published:January 12, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2023.01.003
      In Jefferson et al. (1) retrospective study they use needle without introducer, because of difficulty routine spinal needle. However, SA should be performed using a spinal needle, especially in children. Otherwise, the risk of iatrogenic epidermoid tumor increase as a result of a complication from a lumbar puncture that performed a needle without an introducer (3). Can we ignore the complication and routinely use the needle without an introducer?
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