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JPU-D-22-00452: Contralateral testicular hypertrophy is associated with a higher incidence of absent testis in children with non-palpable testis

Published:December 27, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2022.11.030
      Contralateral testicular hypertrophy (CH) in the presence of a non palpable testis (NPT) is one of the most important physical diagnostic signs in pediatric urology. In this report, the authors have confirmed that CH is highly predictive of monorchia, and therefore very useful in setting outcome expectations during preop consultations with parents. They have raised other important issues, some controversial, relating to the diagnosis and management of the NPT, including examination technique, cut off values for CH, significance of laparoscopic findings and of nubbins, and contralateral fixation [
      • Boehm K.
      • Fischer N.D.
      • Qwaider M.
      • Haferkamp A.
      • Schroder A.
      Contralateral testicular hypertrophy is associated with a higher incidence of absent testis in children with non-palpable testis.
      ].
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      Linked Article

      • Contralateral testicular hypertrophy is associated with a higher incidence of absent testis in children with non-palpable testis
        Journal of Pediatric Urology
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          The objective of our study is to examine the impact of monorchism on contralateral testicular size in children with non-palpable testis (NPT). Enhanced contralateral testicular volume or longitudinal diameter (length) serves as a predictor of monorchism. In the present study, we assessed the ability of ultrasound measured enlarged contralateral testicular length for predicting monorchism (and hence a testicular nubbin) in children with NPT. Furthermore, we evaluated the general prevalence of viable versus non-viable testes in patients referred to our institution with unilateral undescended testis between 2005 and 2020.
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