Configuration of the glans and size of the urethral meatus

  • Hüseyin Özbey
    Correspondence
    Department of Pediatric Surgery, Division of Pediatric Urology and Andrology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia, Tel.: +905325403720 (mobile)
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatric Surgery, Division of Pediatric Urology and Andrology, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 19, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2021.10.026
      I read with great interest the article recently published as a meta-analysis in the Journal of Pediatric Urology with the title “Nomogram of pediatric urethral size: a systematic review” [
      • O’Hagana L.A.
      • Larsen P.D.
      • Nataraja R.M.
      • Pacilli M.
      • Taghavi K.
      Nomogram of paediatric male urethral size: a systematic review.
      ]. However, I have to say that a meta-analysis can be discarded by a simple observation that has been overlooked for decades. Apparently, the “septum glandis” of the penis has not been considered in any of the studies of hypospadias since it was first described in 1877 [
      • Henle J.
      Anatomischer Hand-Atlas zum Gebrauch im Secirsaal (Band 6).
      ]. The reason it was overlooked in pediatric patients should be because of its noticeable appearance in adults, not children. The authors included the distended calibre of the normal urethral meatus in infants to adolescent boys (0–16 years). Although the authors mentioned two of our studies, they left out our key message, which I want to clarify.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic and Personal
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of Pediatric Urology
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • O’Hagana L.A.
        • Larsen P.D.
        • Nataraja R.M.
        • Pacilli M.
        • Taghavi K.
        Nomogram of paediatric male urethral size: a systematic review.
        J Pediatr Urol. 2021; 23 (In press)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2021.10.014
        • Henle J.
        Anatomischer Hand-Atlas zum Gebrauch im Secirsaal (Band 6).
        Eingeweide. Braunschweig: Available via University Library Heidelberg, 1877 (Available from:)
        • Özbey H.
        The mystery of Jacob Henle's ‘septum glandis’.
        J Anat. 2019; 234: 728-729https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.12965
        • Özbey H.
        • Arlı O.T.
        “Fossa navicularis” and “septum glandis”: a flow control valve for the male urethra?.
        Med Hypotheses. 2020; 140: 109642https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2020.109642
        • Özbey H.
        • Devecioğlu D.
        • Staroverov O.
        A closer look at iatrogenic hypospadias.
        Andrologia. 2020; 53e13803https://doi.org/10.1111/and.13803

      Linked Article

      • Nomogram of paediatric male urethral size: A systematic review
        Journal of Pediatric Urology
        • Preview
          Knowledge of the normal size of the urethral meatus in boys is important for safely performing urethral catheterization and fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric urological conditions. However, clinicians often rely subjectively on previous experience and clinical judgement, rather than a robust evidence-base. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to define the calibre of the male urethral meatus in paediatric age-groups.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF
      • Response to letter re ‘Nomogram of paediatric male urethral size: A systematic review’
        Journal of Pediatric Urology
        • Preview
          We thank our colleagues for their comments regarding our recent systematic review on paediatric male urethral size [1]. Unfortunately, as noted in the manuscript, the nature of the referenced data did not allow for a formal meta-analysis to be conducted. Therefore, our aims were to synthesise the body of literature on paediatric male urethral size, and to provide a nomogram for the busy paediatric urologist. We welcome comments highlighting for the reader the existing literature (both historical and recent) regarding the “septum glandis” which is formed by thin ligamentous tissue.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF