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Robotic-assisted laparoscopic transplant-to-native ureteroureterostomy in a pediatric patient

  • Diana K. Bowen
    Affiliations
    Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Department of Urology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Jessica T. Casey
    Affiliations
    Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Department of Urology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Earl Y. Cheng
    Affiliations
    Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Department of Urology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
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  • Edward M. Gong
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. 225 East Chicago Ave, Box 24, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Tel.: +1 312 227 6340; fax: +1 312 227 9412.
    Affiliations
    Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Department of Urology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
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Published:September 23, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2014.07.011

      Abstract

      Objective

      Management of late-occurring or long (>3 cm) post-transplant ureteral strictures usually requires open surgery, which includes ureteroureterostomy (UU) as an option. Recently, robotic-assisted laparoscopic UU for ectopic ureters in a duplicated system has been described. We report a case of a robotic-assisted laparoscopic transplant-to-native side-to-side UU in a 14-year-old girl with a stricture of nearly two-thirds of her transplant ureter 5 years after a cadaveric renal transplant.

      Results

      Robotic-assisted laparoscopic native-to-transplant UU was performed with resultant durable improvement in the patient's hydronephrosis and kidney function.

      Conclusion

      Based on our case and review of the literature, robotic-assisted laparoscopic UU should be part of the armamentarium for long or late-occurring transplant ureteral strictures.

      Keywords

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